The art of thanking

Saying ‘thank you’ is not merely a code of social etiquette with me. I consider it an essential component of human nature, a marker of civility and culture.

Every time we remember to say ‘thank you’, we experience nothing less than heaven on earth.

Animals don’t say ‘thank you’, but express their gratitude in non-verbal ways.

I make it a point to say ‘thank you’ to the grocery store staff, the taxi driver, bank teller, to every human being who does help in some way or the other for me.

I strongly believe that we must express our gratefulness and appreciation when somebody provides a service or helps us in some way.

Recognising people, is the best thing in the world, and is incomparable to anything.

Saying ‘thanks’ creates win-win situations. At the end of the polite exchange, both the expresser and the receiver are happy.

It only takes a moment to say thank you — but your thoughtfulness will be remembered a long time.

I am not trying to parrot my virtues, but I have found that saying ‘thanks’ is the easiest way to spread a brief moment of happiness around. There are no costs, but only rewards with expressing our gratitude.

Unfortunately, I forgot that values differ from person to person. I expected everybody to thank me when I helped them or did a favour to them. I am irritated and frustrated when people do not thank me when I expect them to.

Recently, we offered some of the the flowers that blossomed in my property to some friends and neighbours. Some of them thanked us, some others did not. I was disappointed with those who accepted it without uttering a word. I thought these people must be uncultured. Why can’t say a word of thanks to me?

I realized later that I can’t expect people to practice what I consider to be essential civility. Their values may be different. There is no reason they should share my passion to express gratitude. After all, they did not ask for it. We gifted those as a gesture. Why should they thank me for something they have not sought from me?

Just because they did not say ‘thanks’ doesn’t mean they are morally inferior to me. They may have other virtues that I may lack. Only adversity can test one’s character. It is easier to be polite when the going is good than when the chips are down.

I will continue to say ‘thanks’ to people as before but I have learned the lesson that I should stop judging people and accept them as they are.

Start recognising people around, appreciate them for even the smallest things they do, and life will be lovely!

Thanks for reading.